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Lesson 30 – Minutes after the hour


essaawa ssatu. (It’s nine o’clock.)
essaawa ssatu ne ddakiika ttaano. (It’s five minutes past nine o’clock.)
essaawa ssatu ne ddakiika kkumi. (It’s ten minutes past nine o’clock.)
essaawa ssatu ne ddakiika kkumi na ttaano. (It’s fifteen minutes past nine o’clock.)
essaawa ssatu ne ddakiika abiri. (It’s twenty minutes past nine o’clock.)
essaawa ssatu ne ddakiika abiri mu ttaano. (It’s twenty five minutes past nine o’clock.)
essaawa ssatu n’ekitundu. (It’s half past nine o’clock.)
essaawa ssatu ne ddakiika asatu mu ttaano. (It’s thirty five minutes past nine o’clock.)
essaawa ssatu ne ddakiika ana. (It’s forty minutes past nine o’clock.)
essaawa ssatu ne ddakiika ana mu ttaano. (It’s forty five minutes past nine o’clock.)
essaawa ssatu ne ddakiika ataano. (It’s fifty minutes past nine o’clock.)
essaawa ssatu ne ddakiika ataano mu ttaano. (It’s fifty five minutes past nine o’clock.)
essaawa nnya zennyini. (It’s ten o’clock sharp.)

Note: Time in Luganda: essaawa emu [literally ‘one o’clock] corresponds to 7 o’clock in English; always deduct six hours to get the correct time in Luganda; thus 7am in the morning is “essaawa emu(1)”, 12 am - “essaawa mukaaga (6)” and 4pm - “essaawa kkumi (10)” When you deduct six hours the corresponding number is the on the opposite side of the analog clock. Further, when talking about activities during the day the descriptive noun day (in luganda misana) is not added since it can be assumed and correspondingly the noun in luganda for night (kiro). For example: essaawa ssatu ezemisana.